Teaching and Administration

Publications and other projects designed to improve teaching, learning, and university administration, as well as broader writings on the future of the social sciences.
Restructuring the Social Sciences: Reflections from Harvard’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science
King, Gary. 2014. Restructuring the Social Sciences: Reflections from Harvard’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science, PS: Political Science and Politics 47, no. 1: 165-172. Cambridge University Press versionAbstract
The social sciences are undergoing a dramatic transformation from studying problems to solving them; from making do with a small number of sparse data sets to analyzing increasing quantities of diverse, highly informative data; from isolated scholars toiling away on their own to larger scale, collaborative, interdisciplinary, lab-style research teams; and from a purely academic pursuit to having a major impact on the world. To facilitate these important developments, universities, funding agencies, and governments need to shore up and adapt the infrastructure that supports social science research. We discuss some of these developments here, as well as a new type of organization we created at Harvard to help encourage them -- the Institute for Quantitative Social Science.  An increasing number of universities are beginning efforts to respond with similar institutions. This paper provides some suggestions for how individual universities might respond and how we might work together to advance social science more generally.
The Troubled Future of Colleges and Universities (with comments from five scholar-administrators)
King, Gary, and Maya Sen. 2013. The Troubled Future of Colleges and Universities (with comments from five scholar-administrators), PS: Political Science and Politics 46, no. 1: 81--113.Abstract
The American system of higher education is under attack by political, economic, and educational forces that threaten to undermine its business model, governmental support, and operating mission. The potential changes are considerably more dramatic and disruptive than what we've already experienced. Traditional colleges and universities urgently need a coherent, thought-out response. Their central role in ensuring the creation, preservation, and distribution of knowledge may be at risk and, as a consequence, so too may be the spectacular progress across fields we have come to expect as a result. Symposium contributors include Henry E. Brady, John Mark Hansen, Gary King, Nannerl O. Keohane, Michael Laver, Virginia Sapiro, and Maya Sen.
How Social Science Research Can Improve Teaching
King, Gary, and Maya Sen. 2013. How Social Science Research Can Improve Teaching, PS: Political Science and Politics 46, no. 3: 621-629.Abstract
We marshal discoveries about human behavior and learning from social science research and show how they can be used to improve teaching and learning. The discoveries are easily stated as three social science generalizations: (1) social connections motivate, (2) teaching teaches the teacher, and (3) instant feedback improves learning. We show how to apply these generalizations via innovations in modern information technology inside, outside, and across university classrooms. We also give concrete examples of these ideas from innovations we have experimented with in our own teaching. See also a video presentation of this talk before the Harvard Board of Overseers
Ensuring the Data Rich Future of the Social Sciences
King, Gary. 2011. Ensuring the Data Rich Future of the Social Sciences, Science 331, no. 11 February: 719-721.Abstract
Massive increases in the availability of informative social science data are making dramatic progress possible in analyzing, understanding, and addressing many major societal problems. Yet the same forces pose severe challenges to the scientific infrastructure supporting data sharing, data management, informatics, statistical methodology, and research ethics and policy, and these are collectively holding back progress. I address these changes and challenges and suggest what can be done.
The Changing Evidence Base of Social Science Research
King, Gary. 2009. The Changing Evidence Base of Social Science Research, in The Future of Political Science: 100 Perspectives, ed. Gary King, Schlozman, Kay, and Nie, Norman. New York: Routledge Press.Abstract
This (two-page) article argues that the evidence base of political science and the related social sciences are beginning an underappreciated but historic change.
The Science of Political Science Graduate Admissions
King, Gary, John M Bruce, and Michael Gilligan. 1993. The Science of Political Science Graduate Admissions, PS: Political Science and Politics XXVI: 772–778.Abstract
As political scientists, we spend much time teaching and doing scholarly research, and more time than we may wish to remember on university committees. However, just as many of us believe that teaching and research are not fundamentally different activities, we also need not use fundamentally different standards of inference when studying government, policy, and politics than when participating in the governance of departments and universities. In this article, we describe our attempts to bring somewhat more systematic methods to the process and policies of graduate admissions.
<p>Publication, Publication</p>
King, Gary. 2006.

Publication, Publication

, PS: Political Science and Politics 39: 119–125. Publisher's VersionAbstract
I show herein how to write a publishable paper by beginning with the replication of a published article. This strategy seems to work well for class projects in producing papers that ultimately get published, helping to professionalize students into the discipline, and teaching them the scientific norms of the free exchange of academic information. I begin by briefly revisiting the prominent debate on replication our discipline had a decade ago and some of the progress made in data sharing since.
<p>A Proposed Standard for the Scholarly Citation of Quantitative Data</p>
Altman, Micah, and Gary King. 2007.

A Proposed Standard for the Scholarly Citation of Quantitative Data

, D-Lib Magazine 13. Publisher's VersionAbstract
An essential aspect of science is a community of scholars cooperating and competing in the pursuit of common goals. A critical component of this community is the common language of and the universal standards for scholarly citation, credit attribution, and the location and retrieval of articles and books. We propose a similar universal standard for citing quantitative data that retains the advantages of print citations, adds other components made possible by, and needed due to, the digital form and systematic nature of quantitative data sets, and is consistent with most existing subfield-specific approaches. Although the digital library field includes numerous creative ideas, we limit ourselves to only those elements that appear ready for easy practical use by scientists, journal editors, publishers, librarians, and archivists.