Research Group

Pamela Ban

Harvard University

Graduate Student in Political Economy and Governent, Harvard University.

Sebastian Bauhoff

Harvard University

Ph.D. candidate in Health Policy (Economics track) at Harvard University. He is interested in applying empirical methods to health policy, particularly to topics at the intersection of health, labor and public economics.

Jon Bischof

Harvard University

Ph.D. student in the Department of Government. His research interests include the use of panel data in comparative politics and IR, causal inference and matching, and political economy. He is currently working on the YourCast package in R.

Matthew Blackwell

Harvard University

Graduate student in the Department of Government at Harvard. He likes statistical methodology and game theory, but cannot seem to find the perfect place to apply them. He co-wrote the Amelia II package and frontend for R.

Skyler Cranmer

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interests include political methodology where he has concentrated on missing data problems and statistical computing, and international relations where he studies political violence (terrorism in particular) through both formal and empirical models.

Michael Gill

Harvard University

Ph.D. student in the Department of Government. His interests include the application of statistical methods to comparative politics and political economy, with a primary focus on issues of development. He is currently working on an evaluation of Mexico's Seguro Popular health insurance program.

Justin Grimmer

Stanford University

Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. His research areas include political methodology and political behavior. His work focuses on estimating the causal effects of social networks and political/social elites on mass political behavior. He has also implemented ARIMA time series models into Zelig and is currently developing and applying unsupervised learning routines for a variety of applications in political science.

Yichen Guan

Graduate student in Middle Eastern Studies. Her current research mainly focuses on the relationship between the diverse forms of authoritarianism and authoritarian persistence in the Middle East. She is interested in quantitative methodology in political science, and she is currently working as a research assistant for Professor Gary King and Molly Roberts. In her future research, she plans to combine the rigorous theory of comparative authoritarianism in the Middle East with sound empirical testing with programming skills such as R and STATA.

Andrew Hall

Ph.D. Candidate in the Government Department, where he studies American political institutions and econometrics. His work uses econometric techniques to evaluate the consequences of political institutions. His recent papers have focused on the empirical and theoretical value of seniority, incumbency, and party organization in legislatures. He received a BA in Economics and Classics from Stanford University in 2009.  For more information, please seehttp://www.andrewbenjaminhall.com.

Dan Hopkins

Georgetown University

Assistant Professor in the Government Department at Georgetown University. His research interests include urban and local politics, political behavior, and political methodology. He has assisted in the development of the "Anchors" package for the analysis of survey data with anchoring vignettes and has worked on automated methods of content analysis. In addition, his work on contextual effects in political science has built on recent methodological innovations relating to selection bias, hierarchical modeling, and matching.

David Kane

Harvard University

Ph.D. Political Economy and Government from Harvard, was a lecturer in the Department of Government in 2002-2003 and taught GOV 1000. He is interested in the use of R for teaching, matching methods and applications of statistics in accounting and finance.

Konstantin Kashin

Ph.D. student in Government and an Associate of the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University. His primary research interests include political methodology, the political economy of market reform, evolution of welfare states, and business-state relations. His geographic areas of interest are Central and Eastern Europe and the post-Soviet countries. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics and International Relations from Brown University, where he graduated magna cum laude in 2010. He is also a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society and the Omicron Delta Epsilon Honors Society in Economics.  Prior to Harvard, Konstantin interned at Putnam Associates, a business strategy consulting firm.

Aaron Kaufman

He is a William Yandell Elliott Fellow in the Department of Government at Harvard University. His methodological interests are causal inference, field experiments, natural experiments, statistical programming, and natural language processing. His substantive interests are representation, California politics, state and local politics, voting behavior, and campaigns and elections. He received his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Public Policy from the University of California, Berkeley in 2013. His current research projects include race riots, censorship, framing effects, and interest group endorsements.

Tami Kim

Harvard University

Undergraduate student at Harvard University, concentrating in Government. She is currently working on partisan taunting project under Gary King. Her research interests include public opinion and development of political beliefs.

Patrick Lam

Harvard University

Ph.D. student in the Department of Government. His research interests are in the application of quantitative methods to areas of comparative politics and international relations including democratization and international political economy. He is currently working on integrating various models into Zelig in R.

Christopher Lucas

Graduate student in the Department of Government. His research focuses on political economy and computational social science. In political economy, he works on migration, trade, and foreign aid with a focus on developing economies in Asia. In computational social science, he is interested in automated content analysis, machine learning, and opinion dynamics.

Ryan Moore

Washington University in St. Louis

Assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Washington University in St. Louis.

Rich Nielsen

Harvard University

Ph.D. student in the Department of Government and holds an AM degree from the Harvard Statistics Department.  His research applies causal inference methods to topics in international political economy, international law, and human rights.  He is currently working on comparisons between matching methods.

Maxwell Palmer

Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Government.  He studies American Politics and Formal Theory. His research interests include Congress and legislative organization, representation and redistricting, corporate governance, federalism, and energy policy. He graduated from Bowdoin College in 2008 with an AB in Government and Mathematics. From 2008 to 2010 he worked as an economic consultant specializing in the energy sector.  For more, please visit http://www.maxwellpalmer.com.

Jennifer Pan

Harvard University

Ph.D. student in the Department of Government. Her research interests include welfare state development in non-OECD countries, the politics of non-democratic states, field experiments, and automated content analysis. She is currently working on automated content analysis in Chinese.

Eleanor Powell

Yale University

Assistant Professor of Political Science at Yale University and resident fellow of the Institution for Social Policy Studies. Her research interests are in primarily in American politics, with special emphasis on congressional politics, political parties, and the role of money in politics.

Soledad Prillaman

Graduate student in the Department of Government at Harvard University. She received her B.A. summa cum laude from Texas A&M University in Political Science and Economics. Her research interests center around economic and political development, focusing on poverty alleviation programs and welfare state development in developing countries.  

Molly Roberts

Harvard University

Ph.D. student in the Department of Government.  Her research interests include the application of statistical methods to political economy topics, in particular the the politics of labor, trade, and foreign direct investment in China.  She is currently working on automated content analysis in Chinese and the Ecological Inference package in R.

Xue (Snow) Rui

She is currently a rising junior at Harvard College concentrating in Social Studies with a secondary field in History of Art and Architecture. She is currently working in the China Biographical Database (CBDB) Project. 

Benjamin Schneer

PhD candidate in Government at Harvard University. He studies empirical questions in American Politics, focusing on Elections, Public Opinion and Bureaucracy. He received his BA in Economics and in History from Columbia University and his MA in Economics from Stanford University.

Maya Sen

Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Government and holds a J.D. from the Stanford Law School. Her research focuses on the intersection of quantitative methodology, law and courts, and race and ethnic politics, with a particular emphasis on causal inferences and processes.

Brandon Stewart

Harvard University

Ph.D. Student in the Department of Government at Harvard University. He received his B.A. from the College of William & Mary in Government and International Relations.  His substantive interest include any interest in security, terrorism, and conflict/cooperation dynamics.  Methodologically, he is interested in automated content analysis, stastical methods and data visualization.  Brandon's research has been published in Conflict Management and Peace Science, Small Wars and Insurgencies and other peer-reviewed publications.

Anton Strezhnev

Ph.D student in Government focusing on international relations and political methodology. His research interests include the political economy of international organizations and the effect of domestic politics on foreign policymaking. Methodologically, he is interested in text analysis, survey experiments and causal inference in time-series and network data. Previously, he received a B.S. in International Politics from Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service.

Chiara Superti

Harvard University

Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Government at Harvard University. She received her B.A. from the University of Bologna in International and Diplomatic Science.  She earned her Master's Degree in International Affairs and Pacific Studies at the University of California of San Diego in 2009 where she specialized in Public Policy and Institutional Design.  Her research interests include electoral politics, party politics and political communications with a special regional focus on Southern Europe, Israel and Latin America.

Ariel White

Graduate student in the Government department, with research interests in race, representation, voting rights, and incarceration. She received a B.A. in Government and Economics from Cornell University in 2009. Before entering the PhD program, she worked at a legal services office in Ithaca, NY.

Miya Woolfalk

Harvard University

Ph.D. student in the Department of Government. Her primary field of research is American politics, and her research interests include quantitative methods, political behavior and public opinion, racial and ethnic politics, and social policy and inequality. Her current work uses automated content analysis to evaluate the racial and political content of discourse in social institutions and networks.

David (Wendong) Zhang

Harvard University

Undergraduate student in the Department of Economics at Harvard University. He is currently exploring interdisciplinary interests in statistics and computer science.