Publications by Year: 2010

2010
Designing Verbal Autopsy Studies
King, Gary, Ying Lu, and Kenji Shibuya. 2010. Designing Verbal Autopsy Studies. Population Health Metrics 8, no. 19.Abstract
Background: Verbal autopsy analyses are widely used for estimating cause-specific mortality rates (CSMR) in the vast majority of the world without high quality medical death registration. Verbal autopsies -- survey interviews with the caretakers of imminent decedents -- stand in for medical examinations or physical autopsies, which are infeasible or culturally prohibited. Methods and Findings: We introduce methods, simulations, and interpretations that can improve the design of automated, data-derived estimates of CSMRs, building on a new approach by King and Lu (2008). Our results generate advice for choosing symptom questions and sample sizes that is easier to satisfy than existing practices. For example, most prior effort has been devoted to searching for symptoms with high sensitivity and specificity, which has rarely if ever succeeded with multiple causes of death. In contrast, our approach makes this search irrelevant because it can produce unbiased estimates even with symptoms that have very low sensitivity and specificity. In addition, the new method is optimized for survey questions caretakers can easily answer rather than questions physicians would ask themselves. We also offer an automated method of weeding out biased symptom questions and advice on how to choose the number of causes of death, symptom questions to ask, and observations to collect, among others. Conclusions: With the advice offered here, researchers should be able to design verbal autopsy surveys and conduct analyses with greatly reduced statistical biases and research costs.
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Inference in Case Control Studies
King, Gary, Langche Zeng, and Shein-Chung Chow. 2010. Inference in Case Control Studies. In Encyclopedia of Biopharmaceutical Statistics. 3rd ed. New York: Marcel Dekker.Abstract
Classic (or "cumulative") case-control sampling designs do not admit inferences about quantities of interest other than risk ratios, and then only by making the rare events assumption. Probabilities, risk differences, and other quantities cannot be computed without knowledge of the population incidence fraction. Similarly, density (or "risk set") case-control sampling designs do not allow inferences about quantities other than the rate ratio. Rates, rate differences, cumulative rates, risks, and other quantities cannot be estimated unless auxiliary information about the underlying cohort such as the number of controls in each full risk set is available. Most scholars who have considered the issue recommend reporting more than just the relative risks and rates, but auxiliary population information needed to do this is not usually available. We address this problem by developing methods that allow valid inferences about all relevant quantities of interest from either type of case-control study when completely ignorant of or only partially knowledgeable about relevant auxiliary population information. This is a somewhat revised and extended version of Gary King and Langche Zeng. 2002. "Estimating Risk and Rate Levels, Ratios, and Differences in Case-Control Studies," Statistics in Medicine, 21: 1409-1427. You may also be interested in our related work in other fields, such as in international relations, Gary King and Langche Zeng. "Explaining Rare Events in International Relations," International Organization, 55, 3 (Spring, 2001): 693-715, and in political methodology, Gary King and Langche Zeng, "Logistic Regression in Rare Events Data," Political Analysis, Vol. 9, No. 2, (Spring, 2001): Pp. 137--63.
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<p>A Method of Automated Nonparametric Content Analysis for Social Science</p>
Hopkins, Daniel, and Gary King. 2010.

A Method of Automated Nonparametric Content Analysis for Social Science

. American Journal of Political Science 54, no. 1: 229–247.Abstract
The increasing availability of digitized text presents enormous opportunities for social scientists. Yet hand coding many blogs, speeches, government records, newspapers, or other sources of unstructured text is infeasible. Although computer scientists have methods for automated content analysis, most are optimized to classify individual documents, whereas social scientists instead want generalizations about the population of documents, such as the proportion in a given category. Unfortunately, even a method with a high percent of individual documents correctly classified can be hugely biased when estimating category proportions. By directly optimizing for this social science goal, we develop a method that gives approximately unbiased estimates of category proportions even when the optimal classifier performs poorly. We illustrate with diverse data sets, including the daily expressed opinions of thousands of people about the U.S. presidency. We also make available software that implements our methods and large corpora of text for further analysis. This article led to the formation of Crimson Hexagon
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ReadMe: Software for Automated Content Analysis
King, Gary, Matthew Knowles, and Steven Melendez. 2010. ReadMe: Software for Automated Content Analysis. WebsiteAbstract
This program will read and analyze a large set of text documents and report on the proportion of documents in each of a set of given categories.
JudgeIt II: A Program for Evaluating Electoral Systems and Redistricting Plans
Gelman, Andrew, Gary King, and Andrew Thomas. 2010. JudgeIt II: A Program for Evaluating Electoral Systems and Redistricting Plans. WebsiteAbstract
A program for analyzing most any feature of district-level legislative elections data, including prediction, evaluating redistricting plans, estimating counterfactual hypotheses (such as what would happen if a term-limitation amendment were imposed). This implements statistical procedures described in a series of journal articles and has been used during redistricting in many states by judges, partisans, governments, private citizens, and many others. The earlier version was winner of the APSA Research Software Award.
Deaths From Heart Failure: Using Coarsened Exact Matching to Correct Cause of Death Statistics
Stevens, Gretchen, Gary King, and Kenji Shibuya. 2010. Deaths From Heart Failure: Using Coarsened Exact Matching to Correct Cause of Death Statistics. Population Health Metrics 8, no. 6.Abstract
Background: Incomplete information on death certificates makes recorded cause of death data less useful for public health monitoring and planning. Certifying physicians sometimes list only the mode of death (and in particular, list heart failure) without indicating the underlying disease(s) that gave rise to the death. This can prevent valid epidemiologic comparisons across countries and over time. Methods and Results: We propose that coarsened exact matching be used to infer the underlying causes of death where only the mode of death is known; we focus on the case of heart failure in U.S., Mexican and Brazilian death records. Redistribution algorithms derived using this method assign the largest proportion of heart failure deaths to ischemic heart disease in all three countries (53%, 26% and 22%), with larger proportions assigned to hypertensive heart disease and diabetes in Mexico and Brazil (16% and 23% vs. 7% for hypertensive heart disease and 13% and 9% vs. 6% for diabetes). Reassigning these heart failure deaths increases US ischemic heart disease mortality rates by 6%.Conclusions: The frequency with which physicians list heart failure in the causal chain for various underlying causes of death allows for inference about how physicians use heart failure on the death certificate in different settings. This easy-to-use method has the potential to reduce bias and increase comparability in cause-of-death data, thereby improving the public health utility of death records. Key Words: vital statistics, heart failure, population health, mortality, epidemiology
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Improving Anchoring Vignettes: Designing Surveys to Correct Interpersonal Incomparability
Hopkins, Daniel, and Gary King. 2010. Improving Anchoring Vignettes: Designing Surveys to Correct Interpersonal Incomparability. Public Opinion Quarterly: 1-22.Abstract
We report the results of several randomized survey experiments designed to evaluate two intended improvements to anchoring vignettes, an increasingly common technique used to achieve interpersonal comparability in survey research.  This technique asks for respondent self-assessments followed by assessments of hypothetical people described in vignettes. Variation in assessments of the vignettes across respondents reveals interpersonal incomparability and allows researchers to make responses more comparable by rescaling them. Our experiments show, first, that switching the question order so that self-assessments follow the vignettes primes respondents to define the response scale in a common way.  In this case, priming is not a bias to avoid but a means of better communicating the question’s meaning.  We then demonstrate that combining vignettes and self-assessments in a single direct comparison induces inconsistent and less informative responses.  Since similar combined strategies are widely employed for related purposes, our results indicate that anchoring vignettes could reduce measurement error in many applications where they are not currently used.  Data for our experiments come from a national telephone survey and a separate on-line survey.
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What to do About Missing Values in Time Series Cross-Section Data
Honaker, James, and Gary King. 2010. What to do About Missing Values in Time Series Cross-Section Data. American Journal of Political Science 54, no. 3: 561-581. WebsiteAbstract
Applications of modern methods for analyzing data with missing values, based primarily on multiple imputation, have in the last half-decade become common in American politics and political behavior. Scholars in these fields have thus increasingly avoided the biases and inefficiencies caused by ad hoc methods like listwise deletion and best guess imputation. However, researchers in much of comparative politics and international relations, and others with similar data, have been unable to do the same because the best available imputation methods work poorly with the time-series cross-section data structures common in these fields. We attempt to rectify this situation. First, we build a multiple imputation model that allows smooth time trends, shifts across cross-sectional units, and correlations over time and space, resulting in far more accurate imputations. Second, we build nonignorable missingness models by enabling analysts to incorporate knowledge from area studies experts via priors on individual missing cell values, rather than on difficult-to-interpret model parameters. Third, since these tasks could not be accomplished within existing imputation algorithms, in that they cannot handle as many variables as needed even in the simpler cross-sectional data for which they were designed, we also develop a new algorithm that substantially expands the range of computationally feasible data types and sizes for which multiple imputation can be used. These developments also made it possible to implement the methods introduced here in freely available open source software that is considerably more reliable than existing strategies.
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