Improving Anchoring Vignettes: Designing Surveys to Correct Interpersonal Incomparability

Citation:

Daniel Hopkins and Gary King. 2010. “Improving Anchoring Vignettes: Designing Surveys to Correct Interpersonal Incomparability.” Public Opinion Quarterly, 1-22. Copy at http://j.mp/2nRql51
Article205 KB
Improving Anchoring Vignettes: Designing Surveys to Correct Interpersonal Incomparability

Abstract:

We report the results of several randomized survey experiments designed to evaluate two intended improvements to anchoring vignettes, an increasingly common technique used to achieve interpersonal comparability in survey research.  This technique asks for respondent self-assessments followed by assessments of hypothetical people described in vignettes. Variation in assessments of the vignettes across respondents reveals interpersonal incomparability and allows researchers to make responses more comparable by rescaling them. Our experiments show, first, that switching the question order so that self-assessments follow the vignettes primes respondents to define the response scale in a common way.  In this case, priming is not a bias to avoid but a means of better communicating the question’s meaning.  We then demonstrate that combining vignettes and self-assessments in a single direct comparison induces inconsistent and less informative responses.  Since similar combined strategies are widely employed for related purposes, our results indicate that anchoring vignettes could reduce measurement error in many applications where they are not currently used.  Data for our experiments come from a national telephone survey and a separate on-line survey.

Last updated on 03/27/2017