Areas of Research

    • Automated Text Analysis
      Automated and computer-assisted methods of extracting, organizing, and consuming knowledge from unstructured text.
    • Incumbency Advantage
      Proof that previously used estimators of electoral incumbency advantage were biased, and a new unbiased estimator. Also, the first systematic demonstration that constituency service by legislators increases the incumbency advantage.
    • Mexican Health Care Evaluation
      New designs and statistical methods for large scale policy evaluations; robustness to implementation errors and political interventions, with very high levels of statistical efficiency. Application to the Mexican Seguro Popular De Salud (Universal Health Insurance) Program.
    • Presidency Research; Voting Behavior
      Resolution of the paradox of why polls are so variable over time during presidential campaigns even though the vote outcome is easily predictable before it starts. Also, a resolution of a key controversy over absentee ballots during the 2000 presidential election; and the methodology of small-n research on executives.
    • Informatics and Data Sharing
      New standards, protocols, and software for citing, sharing, analyzing, archiving, preserving, distributing, cataloging, translating, disseminating, naming, verifying, and replicating scholarly research data and analyses. Also includes proposals to improve the norms of data sharing and replication in science.
    • International Conflict
      Methods for coding, analyzing, and forecasting international conflict and state failure. Evidence that the causes of conflict, theorized to be important but often found to be small or ephemeral, are indeed tiny for the vast majority of dyads, but are large, stable, and replicable wherever the ex ante probability of conflict is large.
    • Legislative Redistricting
      The definition of partisan symmetry as a standard for fairness in redistricting; methods and software for measuring partisan bias and electoral responsiveness; discussion of U.S. Supreme Court rulings about this work. Evidence that U.S. redistricting reduces bias and increases responsiveness, and that the electoral college is fair; applications to legislatures, primaries, and multiparty systems.
    • Mortality Studies
      Methods for forecasting mortality rates (overall or for time series data cross-classified by age, sex, country, and cause); estimating mortality rates in areas without vital registration; measuring inequality in risk of death; applications to US mortality, the future of the Social Security, armed conflict, heart failure, and human security.
    • Teaching and Administration
      Publications and other projects designed to improve teaching, learning, and university administration, as well as broader writings on the future of the social sciences.
    • Causal Inference
      Methods for detecting and reducing model dependence (i.e., when minor model changes produce substantively different inferences) in inferring causal effects and other counterfactuals. Matching methods; "politically robust" and cluster-randomized experimental designs; causal bias decompositions.
    • Event Counts and Durations
      Statistical models to explain or predict how many events occur for each fixed time period, or the time between events. An application to cabinet dissolution in parliamentary democracies which united two previously warring scholarly literature. Other applications to international relations and U.S. Supreme Court appointments.
    • Ecological Inference
      Inferring individual behavior from group-level data: The first approach to incorporate both unit-level deterministic bounds and cross-unit statistical information, methods for 2x2 and larger tables, Bayesian model averaging, applications to elections, software.
    • Missing Data
      Statistical methods to accommodate missing information in data sets due to scattered unit nonresponse, missing variables, or cell values or variables measured with error. Easy-to-use algorithms and software for multiple imputation and multiple overimputation for surveys, time series, and time series cross-sectional data. Applications to electoral, and other compositional, data.
    • Qualitative Research
      How the same unified theory of inference underlies quantitative and qualitative research alike; scientific inference when quantification is difficult or impossible; research design; empirical research in legal scholarship.
    • Rare Events
      How to save 99% of your data collection costs; bias corrections for logistic regression in estimating probabilities and causal effects in rare events data; estimating base probabilities or any quantity from case-control data; automated coding of events.
    • Survey Research
      "Anchoring Vignette" methods for when different respondents (perhaps from different cultures, countries, or ethnic groups) understand survey questions in different ways; an approach to developing theoretical definitions of complicated concepts apparently definable only by example (i.e., "you know it when you see it"); how surveys work.
    • Unifying Statistical Analysis
      Development of a unified approach to statistical modeling, inference, interpretation, presentation, analysis, and software; integrated with most of the other projects listed here.

Recent Work

<p>Reverse Engineering Chinese Censorship: Randomized Experimentation and Participant Observation</p>
King, Gary, Jennifer Pan, and Margaret Roberts. In Press.

Reverse Engineering Chinese Censorship: Randomized Experimentation and Participant Observation

. Science.Abstract
Chinese government censorship of social media constitutes the largest coordinated selective suppression of human communication in recorded history. Although existing research on the subject has revealed a great deal, it is based on passive, observational methods, with well known inferential limitations. For example, these methods can reveal nothing about censorship that occurs before submissions are posted, such as via automated review which we show is used at two-thirds of all social media sites. We offer two approaches to overcome these limitations. For causal inferences, we conduct the first large scale experimental study of censorship by creating accounts on numerous social media sites spread throughout the country, submitting different randomly assigned types of social media texts, and detecting from a network of computers all over the world which types are censored. Then, for descriptive inferences, we supplement the current uncertain practice of conducting anonymous interviews with secret informants, by participant observation: we set up our own social media site in China, contract with Chinese firms to install the same censoring technologies as their existing sites, and -- with direct access to their software, documentation, and even customer service help desk support -- reverse engineer how it all works. Our results offer the first rigorous experimental support for the recent hypothesis that criticism of the state, its leaders, and their policies are routinely published, whereas posts about real world events with collective action potential are censored. We also extend the hypothesis by showing that it applies even to accusations of corruption by high-level officials and massive online-only protests, neither of which are censored. We also reveal for the first time the inner workings of the process of automated review, and as a result are able to reconcile conflicting accounts of keyword-based content filtering in the academic literature. We show that the Chinese government tolerates surprising levels of diversity in automated review technology, but still ensures a uniform outcome by post hoc censorship using huge numbers of human coders.
<p><em>You Lie!</em> Patterns of Partisan Taunting in the U.S. Senate (Poster)</p>
Grimmer, Justin, Gary King, and Chiara Superti. 2014.

You Lie! Patterns of Partisan Taunting in the U.S. Senate (Poster)

. In Society for Political Methodology. Athens, GA.Abstract
This is a poster that describes our analysis of "partisan taunting," the explicit, public, and negative attacks on another political party or its members, usually using vitriolic and derogatory language. We first demonstrate that most projects that hand code text in the social sciences optimize with respect to the wrong criterion, resulting in large, unnecessary biases. We show how to fix this problem and then apply it to taunting. We find empirically that, unlike most claims in the press and the literature, taunting is not inexorably increasing; it appears instead to be a rational political strategy, most often used by those least likely to win by traditional means -- ideological extremists, out-party members when the president is unpopular, and minority party members. However, although taunting appears to be individually rational, it is collectively irrational: Constituents may resonate with one cutting taunt by their Senator, but they might not approve if he or she were devoting large amounts of time to this behavior rather than say trying to solve important national problems. We hope to partially rectify this situation by posting public rankings of Senatorial taunting behavior.
<p>Methods for Extremely Large Scale Media Experiments and Observational Studies (Poster)</p>
King, Gary, Benjamin Schneer, and Ariel White. 2014.

Methods for Extremely Large Scale Media Experiments and Observational Studies (Poster)

. In Society for Political Methodology. Athens, GA.Abstract
This is a poster presentation describing (1) the largest ever experimental study of media effects, with more than 50 cooperating traditional media sites, normally unavailable web site analytics, the text of hundreds of thousands of news articles, and tens of millions of social media posts, and (2) a design we used in preparation that attempts to anticipate experimental outcomes
<p>Computer-Assisted Keyword and Document Set Discovery from Unstructured Text</p>
King, Gary, Patrick Lam, and Margaret Roberts. 2014.

Computer-Assisted Keyword and Document Set Discovery from Unstructured Text

.Abstract
The (unheralded) first step in many applications of automated text analysis involves selecting keywords to choose documents from a large text corpus for further study. Although all substantive results depend crucially on this choice, researchers typically pick keywords in ad hoc ways, given the lack of formal statistical methods to help. Paradoxically, this often means that the validity of the most sophisticated text analysis methods depends in practice on the inadequate keyword counting or matching methods they are designed to replace. The same ad hoc keyword selection process is also used in many other areas, such as following conversations that rapidly innovate language to evade authorities, seek political advantage, or express creativity; generic web searching; eDiscovery; look-alike modeling; intelligence analysis; and sentiment and topic analysis. We develop a computer-assisted (as opposed to fully automated) statistical approach that suggests keywords from available text, without needing any structured data as inputs. This framing poses the statistical problem in a new way, which leads to a widely applicable algorithm. Our specific approach is based on training classifiers, extracting information from (rather than correcting) their mistakes, and then summarizing results with Boolean search strings. We illustrate how the technique works with examples in English and Chinese.
<p>A Unified Approach to Measurement Error and Missing Data: Overview</p>
Blackwell, Matthew, James Honaker, and Gary King. 2014.

A Unified Approach to Measurement Error and Missing Data: Overview

.Abstract
Although social scientists devote considerable effort to mitigating measurement error during data collection, they often ignore the issue during data analysis. And although many statistical methods have been proposed for reducing measurement error-induced biases, few have been widely used because of implausible assumptions, high levels of model dependence, difficult computation, or inapplicability with multiple mismeasured variables. We develop an easy-to-use alternative without these problems; it generalizes the popular multiple imputation (MI) framework by treating missing data problems as a limiting special case of extreme measurement error, and corrects for both. Like MI, the proposed framework is a simple two-step procedure, so that in the second step researchers can use whatever statistical method they would have if there had been no problem in the first place. We also offer empirical illustrations, open source software that implements all the methods described herein, and a companion paper with technical details and extensions (Blackwell, Honaker, and King, 2014b).
<p>A Unified Approach to Measurement Error and Missing&nbsp;Data: Details and Extensions</p>
Blackwell, Matthew, James Honaker, and Gary King. 2014.

A Unified Approach to Measurement Error and Missing Data: Details and Extensions

.Abstract
We extend a unified and easy-to-use approach to measurement error and missing data. Blackwell, Honaker, and King (2014a) gives an intuitive overview of the new technique, along with practical suggestions and empirical applications. Here, we offer more precise technical details; more sophisticated measurement error model specifications and estimation procedures; and analyses to assess the approach's robustness to correlated measurement errors and to errors in categorical variables. These results support using the technique to reduce bias and increase efficiency in a wide variety of empirical research.
<p>Google Flu Trends Still Appears Sick:&nbsp;An Evaluation of the 2013‐2014 Flu Season</p>
Lazer, David, Ryan Kennedy, Gary King, and Alessandro Vespignani. 2014.

Google Flu Trends Still Appears Sick: An Evaluation of the 2013‐2014 Flu Season

.Abstract
Last year was difficult for Google Flu Trends (GFT). In early 2013, Nature reported that GFT was estimating more than double the percentage of doctor visits for influenza like illness than the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention s (CDC) sentinel reports during the 2012 2013 flu season (1). Given that GFT was designed to forecast upcoming CDC reports, this was a problematic finding. In March 2014, our report in Science found that the overestimation problem in GFT was also present in the 2011 2012 flu season (2). The report also found strong evidence of autocorrelation and seasonality in the GFT errors, and presented evidence that the issues were likely, at least in part, due to modifications made by Google s search algorithm and the decision by GFT engineers not to use previous CDC reports or seasonality estimates in their models what the article labeled algorithm dynamics and big data hubris respectively. Moreover, the report and the supporting online materials detailed how difficult/impossible it is to replicate the GFT results, undermining independent efforts to explore the source of GFT errors and formulate improvements.
<p>The Parable of Google Flu: Traps in Big Data Analysis</p>
Lazer, David, Ryan Kennedy, Gary King, and Alessandro Vespignani. 2014.

The Parable of Google Flu: Traps in Big Data Analysis

. Science 343, no. 14 March: 1203-1205.Abstract
Large errors in flu prediction were largely avoidable, which offers lessons for the use of big data. In February 2013, Google Flu Trends (GFT) made headlines but not for a reason that Google executives or the creators of the flu tracking system would have hoped. Nature reported that GFT was predicting more than double the proportion of doctor visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) than the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which bases its estimates on surveillance reports from laboratories across the United States ( 1, 2). This happened despite the fact that GFT was built to predict CDC reports. Given that GFT is often held up as an exemplary use of big data ( 3, 4), what lessons can we draw from this error?
<p>The Balance-Sample Size Frontier in Matching Methods for Causal Inference</p>
King, Gary, Christopher Lucas, and Richard Nielsen. 2014.

The Balance-Sample Size Frontier in Matching Methods for Causal Inference

.Abstract
We propose a simplified approach to matching for causal inference that simultaneously optimizes both balance (between the treated and control groups) and matched sample size. This procedure resolves two widespread tensions in the use of this powerful and popular methodology. First, current practice is to run a matching method that maximizes one balance metric (such as a propensity score or average Mahalanobis distance), but then to check whether it succeeds with respect to a different balance metric for which it was not designed (such as differences in means or L1). Second, current matching methods either fix the sample size and maximize balance (e.g., Mahalanobis or propensity score matching), fix balance and maximize the sample size (such as coarsened exact matching), or are arbitrary compromises between the two (such as calipers with ad hoc thresholds applied to other methods). These tensions lead researchers to either try to optimize manually, by iteratively tweaking their matching method and rechecking balance, or settle for suboptimal solutions. We address these tensions by first defining and showing how to calculate the matching frontier as the set of matching solutions with maximum balance for each possible sample size. Researchers can then choose one, several, or all matching solutions from the frontier for analysis in one step without iteration. The main difficulty in this strategy is that checking all possible solutions is exponentially difficult. We solve this problem with new algorithms that finish fast, optimally, and without iteration or manual tweaking. We (will) also offer easy-to-use software that implements these ideas, along with several empirical applications.
Restructuring the Social Sciences: Reflections from Harvard’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science
King, Gary. 2014. Restructuring the Social Sciences: Reflections from Harvard’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science. PS: Political Science and Politics 47, no. 1: 165-172. Cambridge University Press versionAbstract
The social sciences are undergoing a dramatic transformation from studying problems to solving them; from making do with a small number of sparse data sets to analyzing increasing quantities of diverse, highly informative data; from isolated scholars toiling away on their own to larger scale, collaborative, interdisciplinary, lab-style research teams; and from a purely academic pursuit to having a major impact on the world. To facilitate these important developments, universities, funding agencies, and governments need to shore up and adapt the infrastructure that supports social science research. We discuss some of these developments here, as well as a new type of organization we created at Harvard to help encourage them -- the Institute for Quantitative Social Science.  An increasing number of universities are beginning efforts to respond with similar institutions. This paper provides some suggestions for how individual universities might respond and how we might work together to advance social science more generally.
<p>How Robust Standard Errors Expose Methodological Problems They Do Not Fix, and What to Do About It</p>
King, Gary, and Margaret Roberts. 2014.

How Robust Standard Errors Expose Methodological Problems They Do Not Fix, and What to Do About It

.Abstract
"Robust standard errors" are used in a vast array of scholarship to correct standard errors for model misspecification. However, when misspecification is bad enough to make classical and robust standard errors diverge, assuming that it is nevertheless not so bad as to bias everything else requires considerable optimism. And even if the optimism is warranted, settling for a misspecified model, with or without robust standard errors, will still bias estimators of all but a few quantities of interest. Even though this message is well known to methodologists, it has failed to reach most applied researchers. The resulting cavernous gap between theory and practice suggests that considerable gains in applied statistics may be possible. We seek to help applied researchers realize these gains via an alternative perspective that offers a productive way to use robust standard errors; a new general and easier-to-use "generalized information matrix test" statistic; and practical illustrations via simulations and real examples from published research. Instead of jettisoning this extremely popular tool, as some suggest, we show how robust and classical standard error differences can provide effective clues about model misspecification, likely biases, and a guide to more reliable inferences.
Demographic Forecasting
Girosi, Federico, and Gary King. 2008. Demographic Forecasting. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Abstract
We introduce a new framework for forecasting age-sex-country-cause-specific mortality rates that incorporates considerably more information, and thus has the potential to forecast much better, than any existing approach. Mortality forecasts are used in a wide variety of academic fields, and for global and national health policy making, medical and pharmaceutical research, and social security and retirement planning. As it turns out, the tools we developed in pursuit of this goal also have broader statistical implications, in addition to their use for forecasting mortality or other variables with similar statistical properties. First, our methods make it possible to include different explanatory variables in a time series regression for each cross-section, while still borrowing strength from one regression to improve the estimation of all. Second, we show that many existing Bayesian (hierarchical and spatial) models with explanatory variables use prior densities that incorrectly formalize prior knowledge. Many demographers and public health researchers have fortuitously avoided this problem so prevalent in other fields by using prior knowledge only as an ex post check on empirical results, but this approach excludes considerable information from their models. We show how to incorporate this demographic knowledge into a model in a statistically appropriate way. Finally, we develop a set of tools useful for developing models with Bayesian priors in the presence of partial prior ignorance. This approach also provides many of the attractive features claimed by the empirical Bayes approach, but fully within the standard Bayesian theory of inference.
Ecological Inference: New Methodological Strategies
King, Gary, Ori Rosen, Martin Tanner, Gary King, Ori Rosen, and Martin A Tanner. 2004. Ecological Inference: New Methodological Strategies. New York: Cambridge University Press.Abstract
Ecological Inference: New Methodological Strategies brings together a diverse group of scholars to survey the latest strategies for solving ecological inference problems in various fields. The last half decade has witnessed an explosion of research in ecological inference – the attempt to infer individual behavior from aggregate data. The uncertainties and the information lost in aggregation make ecological inference one of the most difficult areas of statistical inference, but such inferences are required in many academic fields, as well as by legislatures and the courts in redistricting, by businesses in marketing research, and by governments in policy analysis.
JudgeIt II: A Program for Evaluating Electoral Systems and Redistricting Plans
Gelman, Andrew, Gary King, and Andrew Thomas. 2010. JudgeIt II: A Program for Evaluating Electoral Systems and Redistricting Plans. WebsiteAbstract
A program for analyzing most any feature of district-level legislative elections data, including prediction, evaluating redistricting plans, estimating counterfactual hypotheses (such as what would happen if a term-limitation amendment were imposed). This implements statistical procedures described in a series of journal articles and has been used during redistricting in many states by judges, partisans, governments, private citizens, and many others. The earlier version was winner of the APSA Research Software Award.
AMELIA II: A Program for Missing Data
Honaker, James, Gary King, and Matthew Blackwell. 2009. AMELIA II: A Program for Missing Data. WebsiteAbstract
This program multiply imputes missing data in cross-sectional, time series, and time series cross-sectional data sets. It includes a Windows version (no knowledge of R required), and a version that works with R either from the command line or via a GUI.
YourCast
Girosi, Frederico, and Gary King. 2004. YourCast. WebsiteAbstract
YourCast is (open source and free) software that makes forecasts by running sets of linear regressions together in a variety of sophisticated ways. YourCast avoids the bias that results when stacking datasets from separate cross-sections and assuming constant parameters, and the inefficiency that results from running independent regressions in each cross-section.
Tomz, Michael, Jason Wittenberg, and Gary King. 2003. CLARIFY: Software for Interpreting and Presenting Statistical Results. Journal of Statistical Software.Abstract
This is a set of easy-to-use Stata macros that implement the techniques described in Gary King, Michael Tomz, and Jason Wittenberg's "Making the Most of Statistical Analyses: Improving Interpretation and Presentation". To install Clarify, type "net from http://gking.harvard.edu/clarify" at the Stata command line. The documentation [ HTML | PDF ] explains how to do this. We also provide a zip archive for users who want to install Clarify on a computer that is not connected to the internet. Winner of the Okidata Best Research Software Award. Also try -ssc install qsim- to install a wrapper, donated by Fred Wolfe, to automate Clarify's simulation of dummy variables.